How the show is exploring a fresh take on grief, loneliness, and sanity

WandaVision | Edited by Tré Vayne

Just as Netflix’s outrageous Tiger King series captivated the entire nation almost one year ago, Disney+’s experimental, sentimental show WandaVision seems to be capturing more than the usual Marvel superfan crowd. What started off as a cheeky homage to the sitcoms of the past has escalated into something much bigger, and much deeper. At first we expected that Wanda might be the villain of the series, then we were deliciously surprised when Wanda’s spunky neighbor Agatha Harkness revealed herself to be the villain (in the most iconic…


365 days ago I dropped everything and moved to LA to pursue my dreams, now what?

Overlooking New York City the summer after graduating college.

The rain pelted us and our wafer-thin plastic ponchos as Justin Trudeau stressed the importance of bipartisanship and environmental concerns from the center of Yankee stadium. I leapt up from my seat with the other members of New York University’s class of 2018 and passed a milestone I have been looking forward to for as long as I can remember — I graduated from college. But as I tucked my tassel to the left of my cap, the wave of excitement, pride, and joy…


Clicktivism is having a renaissance

In the early 2010s, in the wake of the Moldovan parliamentary election protests and Occupy Wall Street, digital observers coined the term “clicktivism” in an effort to delegitimize cyberactivism. Malcolm Gladwell even went so far as to assert that clicktivism (or slacktivism as it is more pejoratively known) lacks “discipline and strategy” and those who champion it “have forgotten what activism is.” A decade later, a new way of organizing is being pioneered on YouTube, a decidedly clicktivist initiative dubbed Views for a Vision that is legitimizing and monetizing passive protesting.

The concept is simple — creators upload videos to…


If a tree falls in a forest, and no one is around to hear it, does it make a sound?

A photo of a woman with an illuminated transparent ball in a dark room.
A photo of a woman with an illuminated transparent ball in a dark room.
Photo: Dalia Franco/EyeEm/Getty Images

Self-isolating due to the growing concerns about the current Covid-19 outbreak has led some to pick up a new hobby, try their most ambitious baking project, or catch up on their watch lists. But the mix of free time and internet access has led me down the rabbit hole of livestreaming, quasi-connections, and our collective loneliness.

It started as I was lazily browsing the app store for anything that might keep my attention for more than 10 seconds. I went through apps I used to have downloaded on my phone and saw one that was so buried in my memory…


It was one of the most upsetting documentaries I’ve ever seen, and not just because of the heinous crimes.

This article contains spoilers.

The spectacle of the grotesque and good old-fashioned shock-value have been the bedrock of true crime documentaries, and as this decade comes to a close Netflix’s limited series Don’t F**k with Cats: Hunting an Internet Killer has all the above in spades. The documentary revolves around the horrific murder of Jun Lin and closely profiles his narcissistic, intelligent, fame-obsessed murderer Luka Magnotta who first gained a low-level of notoriety when he anonymously uploaded videos harming kittens.

Want…


Seeing is believing. Seeing is understanding.

Union Station | Chicago, Illinois

When I asked my mom if she would take the train with me from Washington D.C. to Los Angeles when I moved to California for grad school, I had no real expectations that it would actually happen. Taking the train cross-country was just another experience I knew I would have in my life “just because”, but I never expected anyone else to come with me because why would they. Trains are cramped, stuffy relics of a bygone era and they certainly wouldn’t be enjoyable for such a long journey. But because my mom is…


Digital media has spawned a pervasive, elusive performance that’s dangerous to Black culture

They say that “imitation is the sincerest form of flattery,” an idea that posits that emulation is rooted in a subconscious desire to be someone else and is done in good faith. While the first may be true, when dealing with imitation of culture or the self, the motivations become much more sinister. On the internet, it’s possible to transform into whomever you want and curate your aesthetic without limitations, but what happens when aesthetics can’t be divorced from their cultural importance?

After the Civil War, as the dust from the battlefield was settling, so was the powder setting White…


You’ve worked for it, no matter what that boomer tells you.

Image by freeillustrated from Pixabay

While I was at my on-campus job my first year of grad school, I decided to disregard the Geneva Convention and commit a crime against humanity by asking my friends what their plans were for postgraduate life. I only dared to ask such an empty, volatile question because the friends I was talking to were exceptional. One majored in the humanities, spent a year studying in Buenos Aires, consistently had internships and jobs throughout school, and was on the road to being published with research he was conducting in…


My internal struggles of celebrating a country that doesn’t celebrate me

Photo by Scott Walsh on Unsplash

When I was a kid, the Fourth of July was my absolute nightmare. I dreaded it with every fiber of my being and each year my anxiety around it got worse because I was terrified of loud noises. I couldn’t even be around balloons let alone relax outside while erratic and deafening explosions were happening in the air, it was awful. …


I asked the same twenty-three questions to a group of people with varying racial, ethnic, and economic backgrounds, and the overlap and chasms in between answers help illuminate and further scramble our perceptions of what race has become.

Photo by Papaioannou Kostas on Unsplash

Seven months ago I asked a group of my friends to come in to answer some questions about their race. They had no context, were not given the questions ahead of time, and were unaware of who else were answering the questions (love my friends!). When they arrived I put them in front of a camera, turned the lights up bright so…

Tre Vayne

I am a writer, content creator, and comedian based in Los Angeles. Big fan of food, philosophy, and reality TV.

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